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Fitness Requirements for the Army Reserves

All Army applicants, including Reserve hopefuls, must pass the Army Physical Fitness Test. You'll have to get a minimum of 50 points for each of the three test sections, and your score is partially determined by your age and sex. The test is always done in the same order: pushups, then situps and finally the two-mile run. You can take no less than 10 and no more than 20 minutes to recover between test sections.

Pushup Test

You'll have to do pushups under the supervision of a scorer, who will only count the ones you do properly. You'll have to lower your entire body to the ground and keep it straight. You'll get two minutes to perform as many pushups as possible. Scoring varies by age and sex. For example, a 21-year-old man can get a score of 50 with 35, while a woman the same age needs to do 13.

Situp Test

The situp test requires you to do as many as you can in two minutes. You'll have to keep your knees bent 90 degrees, with your feet flat on the ground, and a partner holding your feet. You get no credit if you can't pull your torso all the way up or use your hands to lift yourself. Situps are scored according to age. A 25-year-old gets 50 points for 43, and 100 points for 80 or more.

Two-Mile Run Test

The two-mile run test measures determines your cardiovascular endurance. You're allowed to walk or slow down, but your score might suffer. Men between 17 and 21 get 100 points if they can do it in 13 minutes or less. The minimum passing score for this group is 16:36. Women in the same age group must take no longer than 19:42. They get 100 if they finish in 15:36 or less.

Testing Considerations

If you have a physical disability, or some long-term medical condition, you can substitute the two-mile run for another activity, such as a swimming or stationary bicycle test. As of 2013, the Army was considering going to two separate tests. One would be a physical readiness test for all recruits, and the other a combat readiness test for military members about to go on tours of duty.

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About the Author

Van Thompson is an attorney and writer. A former martial arts instructor, he holds bachelor's degrees in music and computer science from Westchester University, and a juris doctor from Georgia State University. He is the recipient of numerous writing awards, including a 2009 CALI Legal Writing Award.

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