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Volleyball Rules for Using Your Feet

Volleyball, played with two teams of six players divided by a net in the center of the court, has strict rules regarding players' foot placement before the ball goes into play. In the starting line-up, three players take front row positions and three players take back row positions. Players' feet must be placed on the floor in position relative to the position of other player's feet.

Keeping the Front Front and the Back Back

Before the ball is served, each front-row player -- 1Right, 1Center and 1Left, for the sake of illustration -- has to have at least part of her foot closer to the court center line than the feet of her corresponding back-row player -- 2Right, 2Center and 2Left. Similarly, at least a part of a right- or left-side player's foot must be closer to the corresponding side line than the center player of that row. These rules ensure the court is evenly covered.

Foot-Fault Findings

If players are not in required position when the ball is served, the team is charged with a positional fault, and the opposing team is awarded one point. A volleyball player commits a net fault if her foot completely crosses the center line under the net, penetrating the opponent's court and interfering with play. However, if part of the penetrating foot remains on the player's own side of the court, no fault is committed. No fault is committed when a volleyball bounces off a player's foot, although players may not kick the ball.

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About the Author

For Judy Kilpatrick, gardening is the best mental health therapy of all. Combining her interests in both of these fields, Kilpatrick is a professional flower grower and a practicing, licensed mental health therapist. A graduate of East Carolina University, Kilpatrick writes for national and regional publications.

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