Your #1 source for all things sports!

running-girl-silhouette Created with Sketch.
Cardio

Cardio articles

football-player Created with Sketch.
Sports

Sports articles

Shape Created with Sketch.
Exercise

Exercise articles

Shape Created with Sketch.
Stretching

Stretching articles

lifter Created with Sketch.
Equipment

Equipment articles

lifter Created with Sketch.

Equipment Needed to Play the Game of Cricket

From a distance, cricket resembles baseball since it involves someone throwing a ball and someone else trying to hit it. The similarities end there since cricket has 11 players on a side and a match can last for several days. It also requires special equipment, including a two-sided bat, that you wouldn't find in baseball.

Ball and Bat

A regulation cricket ball is made of string and covered in leather like a baseball. It is slightly heavier though, weighing between 5.5 and 5.75 ounces. A regulation baseball can't weigh more than 5.2 ounces. A cricket bat resembles a paddle. One side is flat -- the side you hit with -- and the other side is ridged. Cricket bats top out at 38 inches long.

Wickets

Game play requires two wickets, which are hammered into the ground in an evenly spaced row 9 inches apart. The wickets are composed of three wooden stumps 1 inch in diameter and about 32 inches tall. Perched across the top are two wooden crosspieces called bails.

Protective Equipment

Cricket gloves with flexible, padded areas are vital since batters don't want to risk being hit in the hands with that heavy ball. Helmets are made of materials such as thermoplastic, fiberglass and carbon fiber, and like some levels of baseball, they'll have faceguards. Players also wear lightweight thigh and shin pads.

Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article

About the Author

Janet Renee is a clinical dietitian with a special interest in weight management, sports dietetics, medical nutrition therapy and diet trends. She earned her Master of Science in nutrition from the University of Chicago and has contributed to health and wellness magazines, including Prevention, Self, Shape and Cooking Light.

Try our awesome promobar!