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Exercises for the Neck to Help With Whiplash

Whiplash is damage to the soft tissues of the neck from a sudden jerking motion, such as that caused by a car crash or amusement park ride. According to the National Institutes of Health, a person suffering from whiplash should use rehabilitative exercises that address eye-head-neck coordinated movements and those that strengthen the entire vertebrae column. Medline Plus suggests that whiplash victims use stretching exercises after their neck is healed to reduce the risk of stiffness or chronic pain as a lingering result of whiplash.

Chin Tilt

Stand in a hot shower for several minutes to relax your muscles. While still in the shower, tilt your chin forward to touch your chest. Slowly raise your chin and tilt your head backward to look at the ceiling. Relax for several seconds and then repeat five to 10 times.

Side to Side

Stand in a hot shower, if necessary, to relax the muscles. Slowly turn your head as far as possible to look toward the left. Return to starting position and turn your head to look right. Repeat five to 10 times.

Head Cock

Stand in a hot shower for several minutes if necessary. Tilt your head to the right side so that your right ear moves toward your right shoulder. Slowly bring your head back to a regular position and then cock your head to the left side, so that your left ear moves toward your left shoulder. Repeat five to 10 times.

Neck Stretch

Slowly drop your chin toward your chest. Keep in this position for about 10 seconds. Gently tilt your head one inch to the right and then one inch to the left.

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About the Author

Maggie Lynn has been writing about education, parenting and health topics since 2005, in addition to being an educator. She holds a Master of Science in child and family studies.

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