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The Best Running Shoes for Fallen Arches

What to Look For

As someone with fallen arches, it is important for you to get a running shoe that will properly support your foot. The best type of running shoe for you is a motion control shoe. Motion control shoes are easy to distinguish because they have a plastic wedge on the inside of the shoe near the arch. This wedge will give you the support you need and help keep your feet and knees from being overly stressed as you run.

Common Pitfalls

When shopping for motion control running shoes, the main pitfall you will come across is the heel-height increase as a result of the plastic wedge placed in the shoe to combat your fallen arches. This increased heel height may lead to unsteady walking and the potential for ankle injuries.

Where to Buy

The best place to purchase motion control running shoes is the Healthy Shoe Store. This online store carries shoes designed especially for certain foot conditions, including fallen arches. As of September 2010, it offers 10 different shoe styles specifically designated as motion control shoes for running. Healthy Shoe Store also offers free shipping on orders over $75 and free exchanges.

Cost

When purchasing motion control running shoes, you should expect to spend between $100 and $150 depending on the options offered. Features such as moisture-wicking material, extra shock absorption, and compatibility with custom orthotics will cost more.

Insider Tips

Something you may not know about motion control shoes is that they often negate the need for custom orthotics because of the arch support you are receiving from the heel wedge. You may be prompted by a salesperson to be fitted for custom orthotics along with your motion control shoes, but they are not necessary for most people. The added support from orthotics in a motion control shoe may actually support your feet too much, which can lead to problems with stability when running.

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About the Author

I have published two novels and more than a half-dozen short stories (and more to come). I write for the Web and have written for radio and the stage.

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