Your #1 source for all things sports!

running-girl-silhouette Created with Sketch.
Cardio

Cardio articles

football-player Created with Sketch.
Sports

Sports articles

Shape Created with Sketch.
Exercise

Exercise articles

Shape Created with Sketch.
Stretching

Stretching articles

lifter Created with Sketch.
Equipment

Equipment articles

running-girl-silhouette Created with Sketch.

Reviews of Women's Bike Saddles

A good bike seat, also known as a saddle, must meet the purpose for its use and fit the person who is using it. There really isn't a one-size-fits-all when it comes to choosing the best bike saddle, especially for women.

Designed for Women

The bony structure of a woman's hips and pelvis call for a bike saddle that supports slightly wider hips and sit-bones, also called "ischial" bones. Most quality brand-name bike and sporting goods stores will carry gender-specific saddles. Those with center slits are a popular choice because of the comfort and protection provided to the perineum.

On the Road

Performance saddles are designed for the road. They are designed with a long, narrow nose and have little or no padding because the forward leaning position of the road bike puts minor weight on the sit bones. In addition, the narrowness of the nose tends to not chafe the inner leg. Performance saddles for touring tend to have a little more padding.

Hitting the Trails

Some saddles are designed for mountain biking. Because of the intensity of the use, combined with the potential for jarring, these seats are made with extra padding, tough covers and a streamlined shape.

Exploring the Neighborhood

A wider, cushioned seat with a short nose is a top choice for female recreational riders. Some are designed with springs under the saddle or on the seatpost.

Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article

About the Author

Dawn Lindy Roberts is a longtime fitness and natural health advocate, and writer. She holds a Bachelor of Arts, a Building Better Bones certification, and is pursuing the Bone Estrogen Strength Training certification from the University of Arizona. In addition, she will complete the Master Nutrition certification from AFPA in 2014.

Try our awesome promobar!