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How to Bake Easton Skates

Prepare the hockey skates. Lace the skates very loosely so that you will be able to get your feet into them easily and quickly when they are hot.

Place the Easton skates on a baking sheet. Ensure there is enough room for both skates.

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees Fahrenheit. Once the temperature is reached turn the oven off.

Bake your hockey skates for 8 to 10 minutes. During this time keep checking to see how soft the foam is. If the foam feels soft enough to mold to your feet before the time is up, take them out early.

Remove the hockey skates from the oven. Quickly pull your Easton skates on.

Tighten up your Easton skates from the bottom to the top. Pull the laces outward instead of up to reduce the risk of pulling out an eyelet. Tighten the laces tighter than you would normally wear your skates to ensure a good skate mold.

Sit with your Easton skates flat on the floor for 15 minutes. Do not stand, walk around or flex your feet during this time.

Remove your hockey skates, being careful once again not to pull on the eyelets. Take the skates off carefully to be sure you don't ruin the skate mold.

Allow your newly molded Easton skates to sit for 24 hours before wearing them.

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Tips

  • Always follow all manufacturer instructions when baking your skates to avoid the warranty being voided.

Warnings

  • If you pull an eyelet out of your brand new Easton skates during the skate mold process, you will ruin your skates. In this situation it would not be covered by warranty.
  • Do not put your skates in the oven with the oven still turned on. You will risk ruining your skates.

Things Needed

  • Easton skates
  • Oven
  • Baking sheet

About the Author

Rebecca Dyes-Hopping began writing as a professional in 2010. Dyes-Hopping's writing expertise include home improvement projects as well as family and animals. Dyes-Hopping currently writes for eHow. Dyes-Hopping graduated from Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School with a certification in data processing in 1994.

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