Your #1 source for all things sports!

running-girl-silhouette Created with Sketch.
Cardio

Cardio articles

football-player Created with Sketch.
Sports

Sports articles

Shape Created with Sketch.
Exercise

Exercise articles

Shape Created with Sketch.
Stretching

Stretching articles

lifter Created with Sketch.
Equipment

Equipment articles

football-player Created with Sketch.

How to Reshaft a Callaway Big Bertha Driver

    Use the heating gun to to dispense heat evenly at the base of the shaft where it enters the club head and the portion of the shaft seen at the sole. This will melt all the old epoxy and allow you to remove the old shaft without harming it.

    Remove the old shaft and keep it so you can use the tip as a guide to cutting the new shaft so it will fit properly. Allow the club head to cool completely and use a small piece of rolled sandpaper to clean the newly-exposed hole.

    Cut the tip of the new shaft to match the tip of the old shaft, using either a knife or a razor blade, depending on the type of shaft.

    Drip epoxy evenly into the exposed hole. This can get messy, so it is best to do this in a garage or over a throw-away protective covering.

    Fit the replacement ferrule onto the tip of the new shaft so that it will fit flush against the top of the club head once the shaft is inserted.

    Fit the head onto the shaft so that the angle conforms to sole of the club head and the small ferrule ring is snug against the top. Always slide the head onto the shaft and never the other way around. It is much easier to manage and negotiate pressure if the shaft is stationary.

    Allow the club to set for at least 24 hours before using.

Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article

Tips

  • If some epoxy oozes out of the hole, allow it to dry before scrapping it off and be careful not to harm the finish of the club head. Most golf outlet stores sell the products needed to perform this procedure; they also offer reshafting services to ensure the job is done correctly.

Warnings

  • This can be a very dangerous procedure that can harm you or your golf club if done incorrectly. Consult a professional before attempting to do the job yourself.

Things Needed

  • Heating gun
  • Replacement shaft
  • Epoxy
  • Replacement ferrule
  • Sandpaper
  • Knife

About the Author

Izzy Barden began writing in 2010 for various websites, specializing in golf and tattoos. He was awarded the Russ Morrison Golf Scholarship in Santa Barbara, Calif., where he attended Santa Barbara City College to study journalism and later dentistry at University of California, Los Angeles.

Try our awesome promobar!