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Indoor Fastpitch Softball Drills

If you live in a northern state and play on a fastpitch softball team, expect many of your workouts to be in the gym -- especially during the winter months. If your team starts play in the spring, preseason practice sessions will also often be conducted indoors. Although you can't do as many things in the gym as on the diamond, there are plenty of indoor drills that allow you to work on your hitting, fielding, baserunning and conditioning.

Indoor Advantages

Although there are disadvantages to working out indoors -- for example, outfielders can't catch fly balls -- there are benefits as well. According to LeagueLineup, indoor workouts can be a "great time to address any lingering issues with form, technique, or general mechanics of the sport." Players can watch game videos, practice visualization techniques and strength train with or without weights. Drills can be tailored to the available space to allow players to bat, field and pitch.

Indoor Drills for Various Skills

Hitting drills recommended by Softball Performance include standing closer than normal to a pitcher or pitching machine in order to improve reaction time, and using a pitching machine set up to throw rising balls -- a difficult pitch to hit. The batter is instructed to swing only at strikes. A baserunning drill suggested byHuman Kinetics challenges runners to make quick and smart decisions. Coaches signal fly balls, Texas League pop-ups or line drives and runners react to the situation. Small spaces also are conducive to quick reaction fielding drills, notes STACK, such as transferring the ball from glove to hand as quickly as possible while getting into a good throwing position.

About the Author

Jim Thomas has been a freelance writer since 1978. He wrote a book about professional golfers and has written magazine articles about sports, politics, legal issues, travel and business for national and Northwest publications. He received a Juris Doctor from Duke Law School and a Bachelor of Science in political science from Whitman College.

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