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How to Use the Tech Rod TR-2 Home Gym

The Tech Rod TR-2 home gym helps to bring the power of a gym membership into your house. This fitness system uses resistance bars instead of weights to challenge many different muscle groups in your body. Several unique exercises can be completed on the system that activate your arms, legs and core.

Read More: Best Home Exercise Equipment for Weight Loss

Lat Pull-downs

This exercise works your latissimus dorsi, a large muscle in your back that helps to move your shoulders and trunk.

How To:

Sit on the bench and grab the ends of the long bar with your palms facing forward. Pull the bar down in front of you as you squeeze your shoulder blades down and back. When the bar reaches your chest, slowly release the hold.

Rows

Rows help to build strength in the shoulder blade muscles that open up your shoulders and improve your posture.

How To:

Stand facing the machine and set the handles in the lower position. Grab one handle with each hand and pull them towards your chest as you squeeze your shoulder blades together. Make sure not to shrug your shoulders as you do this. Hold the squeeze for 1 to 2 seconds and then release it.

Resisted Knee Extension

This exercise targets your quadriceps muscles. These muscles, located in the front of your thighs, play a critical role in jumping and running.

How To:

Sit on the bench facing away from the machine with your knees bent over the end. The foam rolls should rest against your shins. Extend your knees slowly until your legs are straight and hold this position for a second or two. Then, then slowly bend the knees again.

Chest press

Chest presses activate the pectoralis major and minor muscles in the chest. These muscles help move your arm and lend stability to the front of the shoulder joint.

How To:

Sit on the bench facing away from the machine and put the handles in the low position. With your elbows bent and your arms out to your side at shoulder level, grab one handle with each hand. Push the handles away from your body and straight ahead until your arms are straight. Maintain the position for 1 to 2 seconds and then relax.

Biceps Curls

Curls are a great way to target the biceps muscle in the front part of your upper arm. This is one of the primary muscles used when carrying items.

How To:

With the machine’s handles in the lower position, stand with your legs straddling the bench and your body facing the machine. Grab a handle with each hand and slowly bend your elbows as you draw your palms towards you. Make sure to keep your arms at your side the whole time. When your elbows are fully flexed, slowly lower the handles back down again.

Cross-overs

Cross-overs target the oblique abdominal muscles. These muscles help to rotate, side bend and flex the spine and also play an important role in core stability.

How To:

Stand on one side of the machine with your body facing the bench. With both hands grabbing one handle, begin the exercise with your arms extended in front of your body at shoulder level. Slowly rotate your body and arms away from the machine making sure to keep your feet planted and your elbows locked. When you are unable to continue turning, slowly rotate back to the initial position. After finishing a set, repeat the exercise in the opposite direction.

Triceps Pull-Downs

This exercise targets the triceps muscle in the back of the upper arm. This muscle is active when extending the elbow and pushing objects like a vacuum.

How To:

Stand facing the machine with one leg on each side of the bench. Grab the long bar with your palms out and slowly extend your elbows as you pull the bar downwards. Hold the bar here for a count of 2 and then allow it to rise up again.

Warnings and Precautions

To properly build strength, the American College of Sports Medicine recommends two to four sets of eight to 12 repetitions of each exercise. This should be done two to three times per week. Be sure to work with your doctor or physical therapist prior to beginning a new workout regimen if you have any concerns.

Read More: What is the Best Exercise Machine to Buy?

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About the Author

Tim Petrie is a sports medicine physical therapist and a certified orthopedic specialist practicing in Milwaukee, WI. In addition to treating patients of all ages, he is passionate about writing about health and wellness topics. In his free time, Tim loves to run and travel with his wife and two kids.

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