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How to Replace the Back on a Waterproof Relic Watch

Relic is a line under the Fossil brand of watches. Relic timepieces are affordable and stylish, offering varying degrees of water resistance. Any Relic watch -- and most watches in general -- are fitted with a pressure-sealed, screw-down back to keep out moisture. Replacing the back of one of these watches after a servicing or battery change is relatively straightforward; but the right tools and process must be used in order to prevent moisture incursion.

Caseback Removal

  1. Lay the Relic watch crystal-side down on a firm yet soft work surface. A rubber mousepad is useful for this in a pinch.

  2. Adjust the caseback tool's teeth to align with the notches on the caseback.

  3. Turn the tool counterclockwise to free the caseback from the watch. Unscrew it the rest of the way by hand and set it aside.

Reinstallation

  1. Keep the Relic watch crystal-side down on your work surface.

  2. Align the new caseback's threads with the threads on the back of the Relic watch.

  3. Turn the caseback down by hand, feeling for any grabbing or resistance. If you feel this, unscrew the back and re-seat it. Cross threading a caseback is a sure way to guarantee moisture entry.

  4. Adjust the caseback tool so the teeth fit the notches on the caseback.

  5. Set the tool into the notches. Turn the tool 1/4 to 1/2 turn to fully seat the caseback. Do not over tighten, as this can deform the waterproofing seal inside the lip of the caseback.

    Tip

    If you lack the right tool for the job, a balled up wad up of high-tack duct tape or racquetball cut in half works well to get the caseback turned that last little bit.

Things Needed

  • Soft yet firm work surface
  • Adjustable caseback tool

About the Author

David Lipscomb is a professional writer and public relations practitioner. Lipscomb brings more than a decade of experience in the consumer electronics and advertising industries. Lipscomb holds a degree in public relations from Webster University.

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