Your #1 source for all things sports!

running-girl-silhouette Created with Sketch.
Cardio

Cardio articles

football-player Created with Sketch.
Sports

Sports articles

Shape Created with Sketch.
Exercise

Exercise articles

Shape Created with Sketch.
Stretching

Stretching articles

lifter Created with Sketch.
Equipment

Equipment articles

football-player Created with Sketch.

How to Replace Bowflex Power Pro Power Rods

Bowflex home gyms are popular full-body exercise machines. Unique Power Rods are used for resistance, in lieu of free weights. Power Rods are made of a composite material called poly hexamethylene adipamide. You may notice in time that the Power Rods bow down slightly rather than stick straight up. This is normal, and they should not lose any resistance. Tying the rods when not in use with the strap provided helps prevent the bowing effect. Most people can go a lifetime without replacing any Power Rods, but it's necessary if a Power Rod breaks or snaps.

Unscrew the Power Rod pack from the base of the machine with the Phillips head screwdriver. The four screws are located on the back of the rod pack. You may need the rubber mallet to remove the rod box by tapping it loose.

Remove the hole plug from the bottom of the Power Rod that needs replacing. The plug is a plastic circle and comes off easily; no tools should be needed. Unscrew the old Power Rod from the base and remove it.

Insert the replacement Power Rod into the hole. Be sure the slot on the bottom of the rod matches up with the ridges in the bottom of the hole.

Screw the new rod securely into place. The screw should be provided with your new Power Rod.

Replace the Power Rod assembly. You may need the rubber mallet to tap the assembly back in the base of machine. Secure it with the four screws.

Tip

Bowflex Power Rods carry a lifetime warranty. Bowflex will normally replace a rod for free if it broke on its own, and may ask for the Power Rod back to examine it.

Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article

Things Needed

  • Phillips head screwdriver
  • Replacement rod
  • Rubber mallet

About the Author

Sarah Bourque has been a freelance writer since 2006 and is based in the Pacific Northwest. She writes and edits for the local publisher, Pacific Crest Imprint and has written for several online content sites. Her work recently appeared in "The Goldendale Tourism and Economic Development Magazine" and "Sail the Gorge!" magazine. She attended Portland Community College where she studied psychology.

Try our awesome promobar!