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How to Disable a Governor on a Club Car

    Get behind the driver’s side seat and look for a small plastic plate that’s held in place by two small screws. This whole plate will have to be taken off to get to the governor.

    Use a screwdriver to take off the screws. This almost always requires a Phillips head screwdriver. Make sure you keep the screws in a convenient location so you can find them easily. Keep your plastic plate in the same place.

    Look for the governor by locating a piece of metal that looks like a large T. The piece should move back and forth fairly easily. This is what controls your speed. To disable the governor, you need to stop this piece from moving.

    Place a small rubber band on top of the T at the thickest part where the governor moves. Look behind the governor to find a small metal rod that’s permanently attached to the club car and stretch your rubber band enough to connect it to that metal rod.

    Screw the plastic plate back in place. Once the plate is back in place, the governor is disabled.

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Tips

  • You can also use a piece of string to disable the governor instead of the rubber band. The rubber band is a little easier because it has more give than the string.

Warnings

  • Adjusting your governor can lead to accidents and possibly even a speeding ticket because of the high speeds you can reach. If you have posted speed limits in your area, you will still have to adhere to those.
  • The governor helps keep your club car from overheating when the engine gets too hot. If you adjust the governor you’ll need to check the engine temperature yourself.
  • This automatically voids your warranty. If you have problems with your club car due to overheating or other engine troubles, the company often won’t pay to fix it.

Things Needed

  • Screwdriver
  • Rubber band

About the Author

Jennifer Eblin has been a full-time freelance writer since 2006. Her work has appeared on several websites, including Tool Box Tales and Zonder. Eblin received a master's degree in historic preservation from the Savannah College of Art and Design.

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