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How to Store an Electric Golf Cart

Storing an Electric Golf Cart

    Step 1

    Find a sheltered place in which to store the golf cart. This will protect the golf cart from the elements of nature.

    Step 2

    Clean the batteries. Make sure all the cell caps are fastened tightly, then unplug the charger and clean the battery area. Spray the battery neutralizer (baking soda mixed with water) on the top and between the batteries. Also clean the inside walls of the body panels.

    Step 3

    Use a paintbrush or toothbrush to clean thoroughly. This way, you can clean and scrub the smaller areas of the battery compartment.

    Step 4

    Do an overall check of the battery compartment. Make sure all the cable connections are tight and secure. Carefully wiggle the cables back and forth; they should not be too close.

    Step 5

    Check the water levels in the cells. Use distilled water to fill the cells past the plates. If the golf cart is being stored in cold temperatures, only fill the cells with a little water. This will help prevent freezing.

    Step 6

    Charge the battery. A battery that is fully charged will not freeze unless it is 60 degrees below zero. A discharged battery can freeze at 20 degrees below because when it discharges the acid turns to water which freezes faster. Do not overcharge the battery. Once the charge is finished, unplug the charger from the wall and from the cart.

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Warnings

  • If your battery corroded due to lack of cleaning, make sure to spend extra time and energy on it. Even in cooler temperatures, a dirty or acid-covered battery will discharge faster than a clean one.

Things Needed

  • 2 tbsp baking soda
  • 1 gallon water
  • Old paintbrush or toothbrush

About the Author

Sally Fyfe is a junior at Southeastern University in Lakeland, Fla. She is well on her way to achieving a Bachelor of Arts in English and has considered herself a writer for about three years. The sites she has contributed to are eHow and Trails.

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